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Figure 18.5
Desk converted into the Barr and Stroud Solidac composing computer (1959).
Notice the large clockface on the left, and the rotary dial mechanism (from a
telephone) on the center panel. The circuit boards were installed in the file drawers.
to these input controls was not entirely predictable. According to the inventor and composer, Raymond Scott, "The Electronium is not played; it is guided" (Rhea 1984; Freff 1989).
In contrast to the custom-built Electronium, the Coordinated Electronic Music Studio (CEMS) at the State University of New York at Albany, set up by composer Joel Chadabe (1967), was assembled out of standard sequencer and synthesis components made by the R. A. Moog Company. While the CEMS system was studio-based, the Sal-Mar Construction (figure 18.6) developed by composer Salvatore Martirano and engineer Sergio Franco was designed to be performed live in concert (Martirano 1971). Although the Sal-Mar composition logic was digital, the machine did not contain a general-purpose computer. Like the Electronium, the Sal-Mar Construction was guided through an improvisation, rather than played in the virtuoso sense.

 
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